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Major new benefits expertise competition

Poll: When will migration to UC be completed?
Total Votes: 98
Never
44
2017
0
2018
2
2019
3
2020
10
2021
2
2022
4
2023
5
2024
5
2025
8
2026
3
2027
12
Gareth Morgan
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Managing director - Ferret, Cardiff

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Forget all the fantasy sports exercises, here’s a real chance to demonstrate your expertise in the benefits world.

It’s not a fantasy advice unit - for too many people that’s a reality - it’s much simpler.

It’s the UCMS; the Universal Credit Migration Sweepstakes.

Simply pick the year at which you think the migration to UC will finish.  There’s a serious point to this, so make a genuine estimate, because this will actually generate a crowdsourced view of what specialists think is going to happen.

The poll should let us see what pattern emerges.  Never is an acceptable answer as well.

I’ll put in a date of 2021 as my entry.

The prize will be a brief moment of smugness.

Mairi
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Welfare rights officer - Dunedin Canmore Housing Association

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I was going to vote never then decided 2027.  Largely because I think we’re probably stuck with it now although hopefully by then it’ll be a different animal entirely to what was originally intended.

Mairi

Jon Blackwell
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Programmer - Lisson Grove Benefits Program, Brighton

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Migration from IS/JSA(IB) child elements to CTC still isn’t complete (ten years on).

This is LITRG on the position in 2005:

“Originally the Government intended that by April of this year all of the child elements of Income Support and JSA would be abolished. However, this has not happened and the Government has now extended this date so that it is anticipated that the end date of the migration (and final abolition of all child elements) will be December 2006.”

(from http://www.litrg.org.uk/News/2005/transfer-to-child-tax-credit-to-be-completed-by-end-of-2006 )


..and in 2013 ..

“However there are still a small number of existing benefit claimants who still receive payments for their children via DWP benefits rather than tax credits. Under the Labour administration it was the Government’s intention to transfer these people on to child tax credit eventually. Although there is no absolute date set for the transfer, new regulations provide for the extension of the period during which the DWP can continue to pay child elements of IS and IB-JSA to 31 December 2014. It may be that the Coalition Government will leave the situation as it is until the Universal Credit is introduced. This is scheduled to happen gradually from October 2013.”


(from http://www.litrg.org.uk/low-income-workers/tax-credits/tax-credits-advisers/child-tax-credit.htm )


Perhaps this gap between aspiration and reality might be a clue?

Paul_Treloar
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Welfare benefits caseworker, Mary Ward Legal Centre

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Total Posts: 148

Joined: 18 October 2013

Yes, I was thinking of tax credits migration, or lack of, in my answer (never).

Peter Turville
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Welfare rights worker - Oxford Community Work Agency

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Does this refer to UC as currently envisaged or a much modified (‘rescued’) UC that THEY might actually be able to deliver.

THEY - enter our further competition - who are THEY? - this lot, the next lot, the lot after that, the lot in a universe far, far away?

Bring back Supp Ben - you know it makes sense - all those heating allowances would solve the utility bill hot potato issue and Supp Ben also included an addition for water (rates) too!

[ Edited: 6 Nov 2013 at 01:38 pm by Peter Turville ]
Gareth Morgan
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Managing director - Ferret, Cardiff

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I’d define this as the date at which there are no longer any people receiving the benefits which Universal Credit is replacing.  Universal Credit may have changed in the, very short time, before this takes place. 

I’m disappointed that nobody, so far, has picked the official date of 2017.  Does nobody believe this government? (answers on a postcard to DWP, Neverneverland)

Peter Turville
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Welfare rights worker - Oxford Community Work Agency

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Gareth Morgan - 06 November 2013 02:01 PM

I’d define this as the date at which there are no longer any people receiving the benefits which Universal Credit is replacing.  Universal Credit may have changed in the, very short time, before this takes place. 

I’m disappointed that nobody, so far, has picked the official date of 2017.  Does nobody believe this government? (answers on a postcard to DWP, Neverneverland)

By chance a colleague and I had a meeting with a shadow DWP minister yesterday - he doesn’t believe the government either! Without prompting he also noted IDS’s continuing evangelical belief that UC will be delivered on time and on budget in the face of the evidence from all other directions except ‘on high’.

Steve_h
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Welfare Rights- AIW Health

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No one’s going for 2022.

Is that because it is a World Cup year?

Paul_Treloar
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Welfare benefits caseworker, Mary Ward Legal Centre

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Steve_h - 06 November 2013 03:12 PM

No one’s going for 2022.

Is that because it is a World Cup year?

Maybe Universal Credit will melt in the sunny Qatari summer?

HB Anorak
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Benefits consultant/trainer - hbanorak.co.uk, East London

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Why can’t I vote for 2015 or 2016? I have full confidence that it will be phased in ahead of time and within budget.

Debbie Witton
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Senior welfare rights officer - Salford City Council Welfare Rights Service

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I say never - my prediction is that IS, IBJSA, IRESA will be renamed UC before the next election to appear as if something has changed. HB stays with LA and tax credits remain with you until kids grow up or you lose your job, so that’s at least 20 years from now by which time we could be all be queing at foodbanks.

Jon Blackwell
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Programmer - Lisson Grove Benefits Program, Brighton

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Debbie Witton - 06 November 2013 03:42 PM

I say never - my prediction is that IS, IBJSA, IRESA will be renamed UC before the next election to appear as if something has changed.

I think that’s all too plausible.

The move from Family Credit and DWA to Working Families Tax Credit and DPTC was “on time and on budget” (and no-one had to superglue themselves to a desk). How did they manage that?

 

Gareth Morgan
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Managing director - Ferret, Cardiff

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The move from Supp. Ben. to IS was overnight on 11th April 1988. Very smooth too.

nevip
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Welfare rights adviser - Sefton Council, Liverpool

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My prediction is that the last of the claimants on the Speenhamland system will be migrated over to the Poor Law when that takes effect in 1834.  As the Poor Law Commissioners report makes clear, the Speenhamland system is a “universal system of pauperism”.  The Prime Minister, Earl Grey, told the Commons yesterday, “the existing arrangements cannot be allowed to continue.  We aim to dismantle a broken system which traps people on handouts, encourages idleness and is, quite frankly, one that the country can no longer afford”.  We will replace it with a modern system, one that’s fit for purpose, of humiliating stigmatization, moral judgements and grinding, soul crushing, pointless labour in shiny new institutions called workhouses”.

The Prime Minister continued, “the country faces some stiff challenges in the days to come.  We are struggling to bring down the deficit brought about by the recent wars with the Frogs and we must address this.  We will also introduce a Bill to extend the franchise (but not for women or the working class), address the national disgrace of the rotten boroughs and tackle corruption.  The party opposite has failed.  Only we can govern this nation and we will prevail”.

Excuse me, I’m awfully sorry.  I seem to have woke up in 1831.

Tom H
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Newcastle Welfare Rights Service

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UC: never
Migration of IS/JSA child elements to CTC: 2027

Gareth Morgan
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Managing director - Ferret, Cardiff

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With over 60 votes this is the current position.

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stevenmcavoy
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Welfare rights officer - Enable Scotland

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Tom H - 07 November 2013 11:32 AM

UC: never
Migration of IS/JSA child elements to CTC: 2027

is that behind schedule?

Dan_Manville
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Mental health & welfare rights service - Wolverhampton City Council

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Tony Bowman - 08 November 2013 11:23 AM

Never.

Election in 18 months at which I’m praying for a change in government.

Any other party would be nuts to continue in the face of the the travesty that is UC so far.

Nah; Labour are entirely in support of the principles of UC and by next year there’ll be another heavy investment in technology. They’ll gamble losing face if they bin it.

My vote is 2020; end of the next Parliament, with David Milliband calling it a tremendous success snatched from the ruin the previous adminstration had left it in. Of course it will have SDP, EDP and Dis child premiums built back in and that stupid housing cost/disregard business removed too because Labour are building enough houses for everyone rather than trying to mask the shortage and tinker round the edges.