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Forum Home  →  Discussion  →  Other areas of social welfare law  →  Thread

Abolishing section 21

 

Elliot Kent
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Shelter

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From BBC News:

Private landlords will no longer be able to evict tenants at short notice without good reason under new plans.

The government says it wants to protect renters from “unethical” landlords and give them more long-term security.

Section 21 notices allow landlords to evict renters without a reason after their fixed-term tenancy period ends.

The National Landlords Association said members were forced to use Section 21 because they had “no confidence” in the courts to settle possession claims.

But an organisation representing tenants said the plans were “a vital first step to ending profiteering from housing”.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47927706

And see also:

https://nearlylegal.co.uk/2019/04/the-end-of-section-21/
https://twitter.com/nearlylegal/status/1117769645963055104

      [ Edited: 15 Apr 2019 at 02:50 pm by Elliot Kent ]
ClairemHodgson
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Solicitor, SC Law, Harrow

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i think it’s all very difficult

will abolishing this one section solve all issues, or create other issues that haven’t been thought of?

     
Elliot Kent
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ClairemHodgson - 15 April 2019 04:10 PM

i think it’s all very difficult

will abolishing this one section solve all issues, or create other issues that haven’t been thought of?

It certainly will be an enormous change. The BBC article doesn’t really put across what a big deal this is, because it isn’t just the abolition of “no fault evictions” as such - but really it is to give most private renters indefinite tenure except when there are good grounds for the property to be recovered by the landlord - whereas for as long as I have been alive, the default has been for tenants to be given tenancies for a year or six months.

We were all a bit shellshocked really - I am trying to think of the right comparison in benefits terms. It’s almost like waking up one inconspicuous Monday morning and turning on the news to find that the SSWP has - with no fanfare or lead-in - decided to abolish the WCA and consult on what happens next. Its been such a massive part of the landscape for so long that you struggle even to picture what things might look like without it.

Of course there will be all sorts of knock on effects and one hopes that the consultation will pick most of these up.

     
MartinB
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southampton city council homeless unit

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Elliot Kent - 15 April 2019 09:40 PM
ClairemHodgson - 15 April 2019 04:10 PM

i think it’s all very difficult

will abolishing this one section solve all issues, or create other issues that haven’t been thought of?

It certainly will be an enormous change. The BBC article doesn’t really put across what a big deal this is, because it isn’t just the abolition of “no fault evictions” as such - but really it is to give most private renters indefinite tenure except when there are good grounds for the property to be recovered by the landlord - whereas for as long as I have been alive, the default has been for tenants to be given tenancies for a year or six months.

We were all a bit shellshocked really - I am trying to think of the right comparison in benefits terms. It’s almost like waking up one inconspicuous Monday morning and turning on the news to find that the SSWP has - with no fanfare or lead-in - decided to abolish the WCA and consult on what happens next. Its been such a massive part of the landscape for so long that you struggle even to picture what things might look like without it.

Of course there will be all sorts of knock on effects and one hopes that the consultation will pick most of these up.


Elliot wasn’t born.

I however, was.

You could involve the Fair Rent officer, to stop a landlord charging an extortionate rent, or an environmental health officer to enforce a repair…...as you always knew that the tenant would not then suffer retaliatory eviction as a consequence. 

It will empower tenants somewhat, but as the balance is overwhelmingly with landlords, under the current regime. That is not a bad thing.

Biggest losers bad tenants/bad landlords.